A Personal Note and the ’57 Argentine GP

On a personal note…

English: The Masaratis of Juan-Manuel Fangio (...

English: The Masaratis
of Juan-Manuel Fangio (#2) and Luigi Piotti (#28). Photo by Carlos
Alberto Navarro. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Project GP Evolved has challenged me at times.  This is one of those times.  Sometimes you are stuck with life going against you and faced with a post that just won’t write.  There are times when it is difficult to summon the creative spark necessary to create that next great post.  I suspect this is the challenge for many fellow bloggers.  But, by conquering these individual challenges for the greater whole, we continue our respective projects.  On the one hand, this project has been more difficult than I ever anticipated.  On the other hand, it is also more rewarding.  Moreover, sometimes the most difficult posts are the most satisfying.  And, sometimes, we just need the right inspiration.

At some point, we must all pull ourselves out of the doldrums.  And, in this respect, I looked at the great young drivers of Formula 1 for inspiration.  Being a world champion isn’t about the season where he took it all.  For the driver, it’s about the one-thousand tiny obstacles he had to pass through on the way to that particular season.  I realized that sometimes, to be successful, each of us needs to dig deep and rise to the challenge.  Moreover, it is not about the ultimate glory that we may achieve; but rather it is about our personal journeys to discover the greatness that lies deep within.

English: Juan-Manuel Fangio (second from the r...

English: Juan-Manuel Fangio (second from the right) at the 1957 Argentine GP. Photo by Carlos Alberto Navarro. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Concentrating on these sentiments, I busted out my standard issue video software.  Mixing and matching this and that, I found a unique connection between the popular song, “Can’t hold us” by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, that is embodied in the Driver’s mentality.  I am calling this notion, the “ethos of a driver.”  To me, the ethos of a driver is something of a mix of Maslow‘s self-actualization, Roarkian determination, and a dash of Jay-Z swag. The title of the song, itself, interests me.  It was named “Can’t hold us” as opposed to “Can’t hold me.”  The verses reflect on how it is incumbent among each of us to rise up and not be held back; but also, how we also need to rely on those closest to us to succeed.  It also contemplates that we will stumble and struggle, but learn from it and move on.  This video is what the “ethos of a driver” means to me.  If you happen to relate, please feel free to drop a comment below.

The 1957 Argentine GP

English: Maserati Engine at the 1957 Argentine...

English: Maserati Engine at the 1957 Argentine Grand Prix. Photo by Carlos Alberto Navarro. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And, as my practice, I must advance GP evolved  by ‘covering’ the next race in order.  Today, is The V Gran Premio de la Republica Argentina, or the 1957 Argentine Grand Prix, which has proven to be one of history’s forgotten races.  Previously, I asserted that the story retold at GP evolved is necessarily impacted by my perception of it, which is impacted by the particulars of my own life.  The story of GP evolved is also, more directly, influenced by internal factors.  To get to the bottom of what I am saying, sometimes a race just has no coherent narrative, no fantastic passes or terrifying crashes, and no obvious angle to approach it.  I find this frustrating.  However, the task of GP evolved is clear…to address, in some form, each and every official Formula One Championship race.  And so, here is my best shot at addressing a rather forgettable race:

English: The pits at the 1957 Argentine Grand ...

English: The pits at the 1957 Argentine Grand Prix. Photo by Carlos Alberto Navarro. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I previously noted that the relationship, in 1956 between Juan-Manuel Fangio and Enzo Ferrari was not a pleasant one.  They had traded insults throughout the prior season.  So, for the first race of 1957, the Argentina was racing the now heavily-modified Maserati 250F.  Scuderia Ferrari basically grabbed the next four best less Stirling Moss, who was in a Maserati (but only for this race; he was headed to Vanwall).

Moss broke his throttle linkage on the line and had to pit at the end of the first lap.  The Ferrari’s, on the other hand, struggled heavily with clutch problems.  Ultimately, Fangio and Behra took off and won the race.

English: The 1957 Argentine GP. Photo by Carlo...

The 1957 Argentine GP. Photo by Carlos Alberto Navarro. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Wooden Steering Wheel Photo by Carlos...

English: Wooden Steering Wheel Photo by Carlos Alberto Navarro. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The Lancia Ferraris of Luigi Musso (#...

The Lancia Ferraris of Luigi Musso (#12, Lancia D50) and José Froilán González (#30, Lancia D50 / Ferrari 801) at the 1957 Argentine GP Photo by Carlos Alberto Navarro. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Spectators in the pits at the 1957 Ar...

Spectators in the pits at the 1957 Argentine GP. Photo by Carlos Alberto Navarro. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The 1957 Argentine GP. Photo by Carlo...

English: The 1957 Argentine GP. Photo by Carlos Alberto Navarro. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)